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SFGTV
Dec 26, 2012 10:00pm PST
monday october 29 here in the city and county of san francisco home of the world series champions giants. i am supervisor mark farrell. i am the chair of the committee and joined by supervisor chiu and will be joined by supervisor elsbernd. i want to thank the staff for covering today's meeting. madam clerk do we have any announcements? >> yes. please make sure to silent any electronic devices and items acted upon today will be on the agenda anyplace otherwise stated. q. can you do item one and two together please? >> item one is a hearing and resolution and "deja vu all over again: san francisco's technology needs a culture shock." >> thank you very much. president chiu. >> thank you mr. chair. i wanted to make a couple of introductory comments and thank you for taking part in this hearing and in particular i want to thank the civil grand jury report for looking at this topic. i decided to bring with me today these folders. these folders represent all of the documents i have been looking at in the last couple of years on this specific topic and in particular let me just title a c
SFGTV
Dec 26, 2012 11:30pm PST
reporting relationship between the city cio and the departmental cio's functional weakness for city wide problems and partially agree the city's inability to manage these projects in a centralized function could benefit from reporting relationship between the city, cio and department c cio's. number 11. allowing common ict xurchgzs addressed and performed by department by department basis has lead to duplication and unnecessary spending. for this i agree. addressing by individual departments is the reason for duplicative efforts and spending. finding 12. the plan does not include ongoing operational activities and prior funding. for this i agree. the five year plan is a strategic plan and focus on operational activities would be helpful. find be number 13. there are no consolidated budget and staffing plans. partially agree. while there are some efforts there is no accountability and it's not clear who is responsible if spending decisions are not met. now let's get to the first category of recommendations. moving to -- there were a number of recommendations that came out of the civil gra
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 10:00pm PST
over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those w
SFGTV2
Dec 21, 2012 1:00pm PST
you're looking for a park or if you're not familiar with any of the parks here in the city are, this app is a perfect accessory. so we're basically zooming in on the map right now. you can see the clustering 2 12 parks. as you get closer in, it lets you know where you're at. i'll zoom in on a park. you can see many different parks here. if you go to dolores, we'll start to see all of the facilities that they have available. looks like there's a tennis court, a dog play area, some children's park play areas. and if you actually go into one of the children's play area maybe, you can see some details about it. any news about each of the parks is going to be referenced here through a feed. ability to donate to the rec and park. let's say a ballfield, you'd be getting ballfield information. if there's close out based on rain. and you can do some filtering, spot-check the filtering real quick. this is what's near right now. filter, we've got, i don't know, what is it, over 10 categories, maybe closer to 20. and basically anything you're looking for, you can turn on right here. for me, i'm
SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2012 3:00pm PST
ships, cookig class. we have enabled terrorism -- tourism to access parts of the city it had never before accessed. restoring murals for example. we launched in 2011. we have been going for about a year. we're proud to be launched in san francisco and growing the platform here. >> i am the founder of a company called task rabbit, an online marketplace for people to outsource jobs to others. if you need dry cleaning pickup or groceries delivered, you can post that job. one of our over 1000 active task rabbits will be alerted and you will be able to be matched to them. they both run online vetting process that includes an application, background check. we're passionate about the idea of micro entrepreneurship. we have created over 1000 jobs for people in san francisco to set their own schedules, say how much they want to be paid, do what they want to do. we're proud to be here, part of the sharing economy, and hearing from you guys as well. >> i am the director of public policy at air b &b. it is an online community market place where residents can lift their haul -- list their homes
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2012 8:00am PST
us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o assistance with our many business partners. this is a core part of mfac ori
SFGTV2
Dec 6, 2012 8:30pm PST
with the city the past few weeks to try and consume some of the data that's a part of the data sf data repository and tell a story about urban growth. so, this is a mapping platform that allows you to not only visualize your data like you see here, but also ask questions of your data. and i'm pulling data from multiple data sources. here we have data from the city. we also have data from private data sources that read -- not going to mess with it. there's one of the variables now, the bottom you see there is median household income. we're pulling in all these different data sources, creating a beautiful visualization to tell a story at the neighborv level of how the city is growing. and some of the things you're seeing on the map here are a pipeline of information about both residential permits over the past decade or so, how has the city allocated permits throughout different neighborhoods in the city. and some of the other things you're seeing on the map is the approved businesses, the businesses are currently doing business in the city. one of the things we said once we started
SFGTV2
Dec 30, 2012 8:00am PST
officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community together or you have people actually talking about it because the demand side, as we were talking about it, will be there because there is going to be someone there. there have to be people working with it who are getting out there. i think this is what this city is going to be really powerful. in terms of other cities doing as well, chicago is doing some really interesting stuff. scary cool stuff. they're taking 3 in 1 data, pothole request and crime report and matching it up with social media. t
SFGTV2
Dec 28, 2012 2:00pm PST
media. they're getting this really deep and rich picture of what is going on in the city. and you can do that with data when you think about it creatively. philadelphia as i mentioned, they are really active in open data. and new york, again with 3 in 1 is doing smart analytics. i think that's what you'll see happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot
SFGTV2
Dec 28, 2012 11:30pm PST
the city's transit first policy. and what our goal, what the city's goal and the transit first policy is is to make sure that everybody can get around san francisco, that everyone can get to where they need to go. it is an important part of making the economy of san francisco work, to making the quality of life good and better. but it's not just get around san francisco any old way. this is san francisco, and we have values that we bring to our transportation system. we want people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable. and that really contribute to what makes san francisco special, such as our wonderful cable cars. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts a
SFGTV2
Dec 17, 2012 5:00pm PST
-minute stop. one thing we have been brainstorming with the city about is whether there is a collaborative consumption parking pass or parking network. i know you have some thoughts for this on get around. there's something to consider in that area as you have this network of people out running around doing these deliveries and working with small businesses. how can we make it easier for the small businesses to thrive while using a network like task rabbit? >> i would like to follow up and stress that we are eager not just to deal with the problems of ancient regulations but also help the city work together on opportunities. there are enormous opportunities that airbnb presents to the city. tourism is one of the most important economic activities in san francisco. there's great concern by neighborhood groups that economic activity is not going to reach the further out neighborhoods in the city during the america's cup. we would love to work with the city family to encourage america's cup visitors and locals to go out and experience all that the city has to offer in the variou
SFGTV2
Dec 25, 2012 11:30am PST
women come from all over the city. we enjoy the program and we are getting people out to have fun in this beautiful city. >> rec and parks womens' volleyball program is available at richmond rec center. please visit us onli >> okay, good morning. thank you all for coming out today. we're very happy to be here. my name is ed rifkin, i'm the other ed, director of transportation. and as the transportation director, i oversee the sfmta which is the agency that is charged with implementing the city's transit first policy. and what our goal, what the city's goal and the transit first policy is is to make sure that everybody can get around san francisco, that everyone can get to where they need to go. it is an important part of making the economy of san francisco work, to making the quality of life good and better. but it's not just get around san francisco any old way. this is san francisco, and we have values that we bring to our transportation system. we want people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable. a
SFGTV
Dec 27, 2012 11:30pm PST
action this month and we are looking to the bring the city policy to the board of interferes in early 2013 and so as brad said i'll go over the policy and then brad will go over three major projects that we are proposing the use of i f d for. and so the port commission is very well aware in 1969, we got our 54 piers nine react activated and we have an extraordinarily large deferred maintenance problem in the magnitude of $2.2 million and what the port earned as an enterprise is not enough to deal with the assets and the defined problems and so one of our major strategies that the port has initiated in the last decade is to find other source and is so we can be successful leveraging the important assets for the future and so this chart really shows all of the growth of all of these other source that are helping ut to solve our problems and the joe bonds that we just spoke of have been important for park improvementings and i s d which, is in the bright blue is a major proposal to help us build critical flay structure for areas that otherwise, we could not afford. and as a commission m
SFGTV2
Dec 2, 2012 4:00am PST
said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going to keep getting elected to office if we don't work on that and focus on that, we'll quickly slide back. so, we're here today to remember and also to look forward. so, it is my great honor to turn the mic over to our mistress of ceremonies, one of harvey's legislative aides and now the director of emergency management in san francisco and one of my absolute favorite people in city hal
SFGTV2
Dec 17, 2012 4:00pm PST
>> if we could have your attention for a few minutes. reverend jackson is catching a flight and why he's rushing out so if we could hold your attention for a few moment we would appreciate it. >> mike pappas from the interfaith council is coming to spend a couple moments on the clergy work and then we will close. >> i am in the unenviable position of following a national icon but good people i would indulge you for just a moment to hear a humble message. the theme of today's gathering peace is a prospect that we all pray for -- ah, that was -- but to get there will require the collective participation efforts, resources, and resolve of all in our city by engaging faith leaders to join in the broader effort to end violence in san francisco. mayor lee recognizes a precious resource that could be the effective key to realize our success on this issue. at the same time he challenges us to respond to a moral obligation that is at the core of our mission as communities of faith. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to sleep during the coldest and rainiest nights of the year. it's been this mayor and his predecessors who look to what happened at hurricane katrina, saw the key role that congregation leaders, facilities and congre gants can play at the time of a diseafert disaster and called us to stakeholders and mayor lee invites us to pray as well as roll up our sleeves to solve this crisis that impacts us all. from the christian tradition to which i come we hear when one member of the body suffers all suffer. in order to meet this daunting challenge we will need to build upon the work already begun and engage the wisdom and support of so many other prophetic voices those that have much to contribute. the tent is large and must be filled. with our collective resources we will also need to seriously address the root causes of violence, and what are those root causes? education and here i am speaking of after school services, adult education, skills development, ged services, and parent education. another being employment, and here i am speaking of jobs, job training, and job readiness, and finally family services, and here i am speaking of intervention,at risk services, family counseling, reentry services, and victim services. unless these root causes are made priorities and supported with the resources needed our prayers will not be realized nor will our success be attained. common to all our faith traditions is the belief that the greatness of a civilization will ultimately be judged by this and i believe we can show by our works the best of san francisco values. thank you. [applause] >> thank you again. as reverend joe calwell comes for the closing prayer let me thank the mayor and as reverend jackson said calling the family together. i will remind you we all have a role to play and if you're part of the faith community the mayor is asking to you join and if you're a part of the city family or other groups the mayor is asking to you join. thank you again for preventing violence on our streets. reverend. >> both jewish and . let us pr mighty god we come praying your blessings upon our city leaders. we pray they have wisdom to solve pressing problems, the heart to do so much with compassion, and the moral courage to do what is right regardless of personal sacrifice. lord, we pray for our faith leaders. give them the ability to cooperate toward the common good of our city without compromising the personal convictions that make them who they are. father, we pray for victims of violence in our city that you would provide comfort in the midst of their morning and lord we pray also for the perpetrators that lord you would provide transformation and redemption that truly solves this problem. father, we pray for the city of a city that is blessed with so much but still has great problems. lend your arm in support of these efforts. unite us, encourage us, strengthen us, protect us. go with us lord. bless this effort and this city as it under takes it and it's under your great name that we pray. amen. >> thank you all for coming [dog barking] [rocket whistles] [boom] >> thank you for joining us tonight. i am the government policy director at spur. it is my distinct pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [applause] >> thank you. can everyone here me? welcome to spur. i enjoy being here because every time i come here, some part of my brain wakes up that has not been woken up before. i am here to welcome you. earlier, i had a wonderful opportunity to exchange with our panel members about what they are doing and how they're doing it. . i think these panel members are here as part of their own entrepreneurial spirit. they own companies but love the city. they know the spirit of the city is one of innovation, that invites peoples and views, and smashes them -- meshes them together to see if we can make an even better san francisco. we have two other supervisors who may be coming later. we're all part of the initial group of policymakers at city hall who want to hear news views and ideas on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects that have piqued our interest, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make an expensive city more affordable to more people, how to utilize the strengths of the city as a great tourist city. how we can get more folks to come and experience the wonders of the city. maybe they will make their stake here. these panel members have decided to make their stake here. they risked reputation, may be small amounts of money. if they had a lot of money, they may not have had to start this. they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the verge of discussing things that would invite other members of our city family, department heads, those who work in planning or land use, to be involved in an ongoing discussion that would potentially invite and open up our economy and modernize it even further. a year ago, david chiu and i did not know what the outcome might be, but we were afraid a company called twitter might leave our city and that thousands of jobs will leave this behind. we took a risk and suggested we might be able to revamp our tax code for the benefit of job creation. little did we know a year later, that invitation has caused over 125 companies to locate in our city, creating thousands of more jobs, creating an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want to see all of you interact with the city and make sure it is reflective of what you believe the city can be. one that our policy makers and american in dade in which you on thank you for being here at spur. [applause] >> thank you. i think we will also year from supervisors got -- supervisor scott wiener. >> this turnout's shows how significant this is to the future of the city. we were with a smaller group earlier. i will stress that san francisco is a city with a dichotomy going on. in many ways, we are a cutting edge city in terms of technology, food, transportation, there are all sorts of things where we are ahead of the curve. we attract a lot of people like you who are forward-thinking and want to do things in a different and more innovative way. we're also a really old school city. the change is challenging. david and i talk about this a lot. we're trying to do things differently. we get a lot of reflexive push back, whether you are talking about cars sharing on streets, or changing zoning to create new housing to make the city more affordable and inclusive. you have those kinds of difficult conversations. so much of this is about educating the city as a whole from all generations and perspectives. our housing policies and transportation systems are not always sustainable. if we want to remain a cutting edge and diversity that draws all sorts of people here, we're going to have to change. we're going to have to consider new ways of doing things the year or two ago we may not have been comfortable thinking about. there is a big education process that has to occur. i know we will work together to make sure that happens. i know we can move in the right direction. i look forward to that work. thank you. [applause] >> rounding out the to affect the -- trifecta is our own board of supervisors president, david chiu. >> if you are like me, you did not come here to hear from elected officials. i look forward to hearing from the innovators. i wanted to join my colleagues in assuring all of you that we are looking forward to working with you to figure out how we create san francisco as the capital of innovation and the new economy. before i joined the board of supervisors, i started a web 1.0 company. what makes our city special is that everyone of you have ideas that will change our city and change the world. our mayor is responsible for managing the 50 plus executive- branch departments that will be interfacing with many of the policy areas you impact. scott and i and our colleagues are in charge of legislating and adapting to new technologies you have that are changing the way we all live. one thing we like to say at city hall is that as goes san francisco, often times so goes the rest of the country. as goes the rest of the country, so goes the world. i believe we're starting something special today that will do that for the entire planet. thank you for being here. i am looking forward to working with you. [applause] >> welcome. my name is ontario smith. i volunteer is a member of the board of directors. i would like to welcome you for the dialogue on the shared economy. spur is a non-profit organization. we support good planning and government research and advocacy. we put ideas and action together to make a better city and region. please raise your hands if you are a member. one hand, actually. they keep your support. it means a lot to us. if you did not raise your hand -- thank you for your support. it means a lot to us. if you did not raise your hand, i encourage you to become a member. members receive our publication and get into all the events free or with the members' discount. tonight will be recorded for distribution on the website. this will include the audience question and answers section. i would like to invite you to two upcoming events this week. tomorrow at 12:30, the history of proposition 13. on thursday it 12:30, the city budget and regional calendar. now to our panelists and moderator. the first panelist is just gonna scorpio -- jessica scorpio of get around. it creates a marketplace for peer to peer car sharing. she completed the inaugural graduate studies at a new school that focuses on inspiring leaders to understand and fulfill [unintelligible] to adjust humanities' grand challenges. next is molly turner. joe could not make it. she is the director of public policy. next is leah of taskrabbit.com in market place where you could outsource small jobs and tasks. it is a pioneering service network, a concept she conceived and has evangelized. service networking describes the productive power of a web based social network community. since its founding in 2008, she has grown to more than 40 employees and has expanded to boston, chicago, los angeles, new york city, portland, san francisco, and seattle, with several more markets to come. under her leadership, it was named one of the next big things in tech by the wall street journal, the start up to watch by ink magazine. please welcome leah. jamie wong is the co-founder and ceo of viable.com. her vision of a more open world and exchanges through travel is the driving force. her commitment to bringing travel experiences to the world by making it easier to find, create, and book provides a platform for the community. she is a dynamic creative and leader with a passion for bringing ideas to market the change the way people live. finally, jay. in his girl as the chief innovation officer, he is working with the tech community and public to bring the government into the digital age. a partnership announced in 2012 will open the doors of government to our tech community to drive new solutions and businesses. if you have ideas for innovating services for government, please send him a tweet. finally, our moderator. he is the co-founder and publisher of an online magazine. i will let him begin the program. >> what a turnout. this is amazing. thank you, spur. i want to make a quick announcement. a wise person told me that if you want people to come to your revolution, through the best party. i am headed over to thursday -- thirsty bear after we experience the hospitality of spur. drinks are on me. [applause] yeah! i want to echo the comments of david chiu. i think this is a big moment. i want to celebrate. mayor lee's working group can make a great city even greater. other cities are watching san francisco. what we do here will influence them, and that could change the world. there are a lot of questions, too. the sharing economy waits to be shaped by policy. it is in its adolescence. this is a transformative moment. it is waiting to be shaped by policy, but for whose benefit? we believe it should be shaped for the benefit of as many people as possible, and especially for those who need it the most. . we also need new regulations, not simply application of the old. otherwise, the sharing economy will fail to meet its promises. 30 of things that are the biggest threats to our society. i will open a panel -- there are two things i think are the biggest threats to our society. i will give you a high level brief of the sharing economy. there is no textbook definition of the sharing economy. we will then begin the panel discussion which will last for 45 minutes or an hour, however long you want it to last. before i dived in here, raise your hand if you are familiar with at least one of these books. i highly recommend all of them. the one on the end is coming out in may. "share or die" -- i do not recommend that for marketing, but for a cause, we're trying to push a boundary and break a trail for new companies to follow. that is our perspective about what is at stake on a planet of finite resources with a growing population and growing per capita consumption. it should be obvious that we should be talking about sharing. this is a gigantic hole in our public dialogue. this panel and the working group and hopefully the book can fix that. see how this works. we face disaster unless we simultaneously reduce resource consumption and raise two million people out of poverty. this is the challenge we have in the 21st century. the growth the economy we are moving out of hopefully cannot do that. it is what got us into the jam we are in now. you are probably very familiar with the whitney we hear all the time. we're using 40% more resources annually than the earth can replenish. we're draining our natural capital. there has been 15 years of sustainable development with development of new green technologies. in 2011, we have the largest out of carbon ever. inequality has reached epic proportions around the world. in the united states, the richest 1% owned 38% of all wealth. the bottom 90% hold 73% of all debt. we are wiping out the planet and the public is left holding the bag. we definitely need something completely different. putting the moral outrage aside for a second, this situation also puts cities at great risk. we've only gotten a taste of the destruction that -- disruption as possible with the numerous revolutions that broke out. the crisis will land hardest in cities. i see city's borrowing language from complexity theory, i see i see city's borrowing language from complexity theory, i see
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 7:00pm PST
sources, creating a beautiful visualization to tell a story at the neighborv level of how the city is growing. and some of the things you're seeing on the map here are a pipeline of information about both residential permits over the past decade or so, how has the city allocated permits throughout different neighborhoods in the city. and some of the other things you're seeing on the map is the approved businesses, the businesses are currently doing business in the city. one of the things we said once we started visualizing on the map the slow and more rapid growth of residential -- residential property in soma and then in 2011 you just saw obviously a huge residential boom in the downtown area. so, we've just actually -- we're a company in southern california. we just relocated up here, small little office in san francisco, trying to better understand the community moving at a fast pace here. part of doing that is working with the city and better understanding how we can support open data. so, thank you. (applause) >> good morning, everybody. can you hear me? good morning and welcome
SFGTV
Dec 22, 2012 3:00am PST
performed in the city right of way and all work that the work will density and improve the soil conditions underneath the buildings and not of course, the operations of the buildings and should -- be detected duress the course of the project the s fm ta will be able to use the gouts to -- the probability has successfully acquired the off street properties and easesments to construct the property thus far and has successfully acquired all but right of the temporary construction licenses we are seek this resident luxe to avoid delays to the project schedule and your action today will hal low the project to continue these negotiations without jeopardizing the project schedule i have a brief presentation on the project and to show you how the grouting tools will be stoled installed to protect the buildings central subway is a 1.5-mile extension of the t line providing improved transportation services for 60% of the people that live adjacent to the april line want and have no other form of transportation but central subway will cut trip teams to over half 22 minutes with the central subway it w
SFGTV2
Dec 2, 2012 7:00am PST
we have details for the next few weeks. you can get tickets online in advance or at the door. >> thank you so much. thank you for watching culturewire on sf gov tv. >> so, we're just going to take you through this really quickly. over 200 parks, over 1100 facilities are all contained within this. everything is based around you as a human being have your app. if you're looking for a park or if you're not familiar with any of the parks here in the city are, this app is a perfect accessory. so we're basically zooming in on the map right now. you can see the clustering 2 12 parks. as you get closer in, it lets you know where you're at. i'll zoom in on a park. you can see many different parks here. if you go to dolores, we'll start to see all of the facilities that they have available. looks like there's a tennis court, a dog play area, some children's park play areas. and if you actually go into one of the children's play area maybe, you can see some details about it. any news about each of the parks is going to be referenced here through a feed. ability to donate to the rec and park. let's say a ballfield, you'd be getting ballfield information. if there's close out based on rain. and you can do some filtering, spot-check the filtering real quick. this is what's near right now. filter, we've got, i don't know, what is it, over 10 categories, maybe closer to 20. and basically anything you're looking for, you can turn on right here. for me, i'm a dog owner. maybe i want to take the kids as well. and i want to find a park that has all of these things. i filter, i go back. i'll find which ones are the closest via the list or the map view. and then when you actually go ahead and click on any of these parks, you'll be brought to -- you should be brought to the ones that have actual dog parks and the other filters that were put on the picnic area. so, there you see you've got dog play area, picnic area. additionally, there's feedback that can be pushed through this. any reservations for the picnic areas in park and rec, golden gate park has quite a few. you can actually go ahead and begin to do reservations on here. you just choose your picnic table and go through this. you can also search for whatever it is that you're looking for. if you're looking for dolores park, we just did a search for dolores, brings you right to it. you can go inside and take a look at what's available there. and you can also get directions. zoom back in on this. and, so, very simple, just direction. does anyone have any questions? okay. we've got about 8 minutes until we've got the mayor coming on. so -- >> [inaudible]. >> hi, i'm the founder and ceo of apple-liscious. a couple things to talk about for the mobile app. we built the platform for the department of rec and park. looking towards the future, which is really kind of what bill ginsler was doing, making information first, but second, adding the financial component, making transactions which we have built into the mobile commerce platform with the hierarchical structure from the top down, enabling the city to actually manage all of their own financial transactions. from ticketing, reservations, permitting, just about every component you can think of, of interacting with the city as a business itself, which most people -- which is kind of a big differentiation factor in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly how many people go by some of the busiest areas in san francisco. so, you can see here san francisco, on average total, i think we had 150 people cross our sensors on average for every sensor. in case you want to go into time density. so, we end up getting these really, really great visualizations of the busiest times and the least busiest times of people moving around san francisco. you want to go down into union square? you can see the data changes dramatically when we change the neighborhood. and just illustrates how different every neighborhood in san francisco really is. we're announcing today that we're providing some of this data to the city as a kind of public service to help the citizens here figure out how many people walk around their neighborhood. but mostly it's to help public service, like the fire department, the police department, the mta know more about how people move around. so, we're providing crowd data. so, if a thousand people pass one of our sensors in an hour, that data will be available publicly. every month. so, chris, do you want to go a little deeper? >> you can see we have a lot of blocks around union square covered. when you show this data to property owners and real estate agents and to retailers, they want to know more about how much -- how many people walk in front of their store every day, kind of the story -- the way i thought of the idea was standing in my balcony looking down at walgreens and realizing they had no idea how many people pass their store every day. they don't know that, how do they know if they're successful because the weather is nice, or because they did something right. so, you want to go into business hours? the wi-fi store here. so, one of our clients is saks fifth avenue and we end up giving them some really great charts about how many people pass while they're open. so, you can see here. these are the hours that they're open. and the dark areas are the hours that they're closed. and if they're open from 10:00 to 7:00 p.m., they capture 81% of the people that walk by. so, that might mean that they want to move their hours one way or the other and capture more people, or stay the same. and it's just data they didn't have before. and i think you can imagine what 5% more people, more customers to a big retailer would be in revenue. i can't tell if they're trying to cut me short or telling me to keep going. [laughter] >> this wasn't even -- this wasn't even part of it. i guess people are just late. so, i get up here. all right. yeah, so, if you go down and in our interface, this is a web app that's available to all our customers, you can see here the busiest day in san francisco is friday. the busiest time, the busiest hour on average is 1:00 to 2:00 p.m.. on september 14th was the busiest day of last month. and the people can line this data up with their sales data or with public transit or anything they're looking at and they'll be able to figure out real quickly if there's a correlation. and if there's more pedestrians, less pedestrians. what? >> [inaudible]. >> i'm sorry? >> [inaudible]. >> so, this is a tool that we're developing based on the data that we're announcing today. you can see them over here a little bit better. but you can see that to most departments, most agencies in san francisco, the city, most agencies, they'll be able to use this in a real way. they'll be able to look -- police can look at an interface and be able to see exactly how many people are in these areas that they might have to go to -- kind of wrap up now, i guess. no, i can't. so, you know, and we can also show predictive data about when the giants are going to be playing. so, anyway, you can come over for a demo later. i think we'll be on a panel later. now i think it's the mayor's turn. (applause) >> okay, everybody, [speaker not understood]. we've actually been working with the city the past few weeks to try and consume some of the data that's a part of the data sf data repository and tell a story about urban growth. so, this is a mapping platform that allows you to not only visualize your data like you see here, but also ask questions of your data. and i'm pulling data from multiple data sources. here we have data from the city. we also have data from private data sources that read -- not going to mess with it. there's one of the variables now, the bottom you see there is median household income. we're pulling in all these different data sources, creating a beautiful visualization to tell a story at the neighborv level of how the city is growing. and some of the things you're seeing on the map here are a pipeline of information about both residential permits over the past decade or so, how has the city allocated permits throughout different neighborhoods in the city. and some of the other things you're seeing on the map is the approved businesses, the businesses are currently doing business in the city. one of the things we said once we started visualizing on the map the slow and more rapid growth of residential -- residential property in soma and then in 2011 you just saw obviously a huge residential boom in the downtown area. so, we've just actually -- we're a company in southern california. we just relocated up here, small little office in san francisco, trying to better understand the community moving at a fast pace here. part of doing that is working with the city and better understanding how we can support open data. so, thank you. (applause) >> good morning, everybody. can you hear me? good morning and welcome to the hatchery. this is our newest space. my name is rajul pakash, i'm one of the founders. along with my other partners, chris and richy in the back, and lawrence who could not make it. welcome to 6 45 harrison and the hatchery. it's super exciting to have such a dynamic group of people from both the public and private sector here today. and as a self-proclaimed geek and tech entrepreneur, this is really exciting for me. before i wax on about that's correct really quickly want to give you just a quick 90-second thing about the hatchery. we opened our doors about a year ago at 625 2nd street, bought 21 thou square feet there. we opened our doors and within a year we've grown into a whole new space which we opened two months ago. * across both spaces we have about 135 companies and it's sort of awesome. they are not all tech. we sort of range from writers and virtual wineries which are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with our tenants. it's an honor to have you guys here. enjoy the day and it's an honor to welcome jane back to the hatchery. (applause) >> good morning, my name is jane. i'm the mayor's chief innovation officer. before we get things started, i'm actually going to have one more company come up here because we're actually waiting for the press to get finalized and set upful. so, a couple more minutes to read here. how much time, press? no one is giving me any signs here. you guys are ready, great. so, we're going to hold off and have you guys come up a little bit later. so, again, my name is james. i want to thank the hatchery for hosting us here and being such an important part of the start-up community and for helping san francisco businesses start and grow here in san francisco. our first speaker is mayor lee. he has been a strong advocate of open data, both in his current position and also historically as the city administrator. and he's going to be sharing with you some really exciting announcements and his vision for open data. mayor? (applause) >> hi, good morning. welcome again to innovation month in san francisco. it's great to be here. as you know, i've been working really hard with organizations like sf city and code for america and others to make sure that we keep being leaders in technology and celebrating our status, but also implementing the programs to help us continue that very nice title we have, the innovation capital of the world. and i am here today in collaboration with board president david chiu and so many others from our committee on information technology, spur, our different various city departments, really trying to improve on what we've done already. back in 2009 then mayor gavin newsome to the light of all of us had introduced that we ought to really establish some guidelines to open up our city's data. and in the year later, the board, less legislation, the first open data legislation in san francisco that made us cutting edge throughout the country, the first to come out and say to everybody in the public, to people who wanted to create businesses, wanted to look at the city with kind of an open invitation to involve themselves with what the city had. and part of that really neat understanding was that we were holding onto so much of our own data in our own silos with our own very focused obligations that we had, and not realizing that if we had released that data to the public, we could really allow them to help us create even more efficient government, along with some very good entrepreneurial efforts that are reflected in today's announcements and some of our partners that are here today. so, three years later, after announcing this and after doing the first generation of open data legislation, open sf is still a very vigorous, and we want to do even more. we've teamed up again with board president david chiu who has been personally involved with this and helping us and guide us with his knowledge, having been a small business owner himself, with how we can do even better. and today we are announcing actually two areas of improvements to our piece of legislation that i think will get people even more excited. the first is after a couple of years of opening up some of the data streams in our city and seeing how this data had already started, some companies, some entrepreneurs develop applications, helped us already with identifying some additional needs in the city and involving more people, we want to do even more along that line. and, so, this legislation will allow us to establish, along with the best practices that are going on in new york, chicago, and the sunlight foundation, that is to create a position in the city, basically establishing a data office, an open data officer for the city, somebody that's going to help jay naff. jay is like our external innovation officer. he's helping me connect up all the time with all of the different companies in the city that are establishing and creating things. but i need somebody on the inside. we have a 60-department bureaucracy. they're still working in a lot of different silos and one of the things that we still have to do is get them on a higher level of sharing their data. so, establishing a chief data officer for the city that will work with all the different departments, establish some additional standards for them to create pinpoints in every department of what their data is, what they may not be aware of that they're collecting and computers in our departments and allow that data to flow out. this will be a good addition and a great improvement. it is part of the best practices that we're learning across the country that if we establish a data person, person that will really look for opportunities and establish them with the departments and bring more data out, that will improve our city's performance. >>> the other roll out we're having today, government for the last three years, our government has really been on both the pressure point and i think now realizing a tremendous opportunity to allow our data to go out. why not also in return ask for companies who are also collecting data to share that with city government? that's another great exchange that we have. and i know there's a lot of companies out there that do collect a lot of data, whether they're your credit card companies, your banks and so forth. if there is a way that their data can come to us, it might very well be the grounds for even better public service for all of our different departments, whether we're talking about health or sports or kinds of things that our public would use. and i want to serve up an example. there's been a company here in san francisco called motion loft and they have been creating sensors in various departments. they've covered some 18 different neighborhoods in our city with thousands of different sensors to track pedestrians, vehicles, maybe later on they'll tag bicycle traffic. and that data in the various neighborhoods have, i think, been incredible for their company to launch and to work in collaboration with other companies to see how movement in the city can help us establish patterns, trends, and other things. and they're going to share that data with us. and i believe that data is going to be value with us as we figure out challenges like the small businesses along west portal or in terra val, along 3rd street who see their vacancies and they ask the mayor, how can you invest in neighborhood strategy work a little better with us to attract people to come and be customers in our neighborhood, coffee shops, restaurants, salons and other things? how can we do that? we've always scratched our head saying, you kind of have to do it yourself. you have to create your ideas yourself. and now we're saying, well, maybe there is data out there that could help establish some best practices, can help maybe quicken the ideas of what might be more attracted to our smaller neighborhoods. well, this is the kind of data out there, analytics, if you will, the analytical model that are being created by our local san francisco companies like motion loft and others, who are using these data yet can share it with the government as motion loft has agreed to do today, as part of yet another exciting phase. and you ought not be surprised when we ask some of the larger companies and suggest to them that we can be a better city if they share their data through data sf with us. and if we can then download it and have it available to everybody else, i think that that would be a great combination. these are a couple of the improvements that we wanted to announce today in our open data legislation in collaboration, again, with our board. but also in collaboration with code for america who has been working with us, with sf city as i mentioned earlier, spur, our department of technology, our committee on information technology, and then we have an open data working group which really tries to get volunteers from the different departments to work together and see what other kinds of data analytics that we could provide to the public. >>> i want to just say today, you're going to hear some demonstration projects that are already started with our open data. again, as a way to celebrate innovation month, not only are we opening up different companies throughout san francisco, but we want to also encourage, examples we're going to be announcing yoyo working with phil ginsberg to provide data where are small parks or where the events are happening. what is the cost? how to get there in the hours that they're operating? a smart phone application for all of our events in recreation and park department, that to me is going to be invaluable to visitors and to our neighborhoods. bronwin who is working with us on data information from neighborhoods in our city, growth trends, that kind of data certainly is going to help a department like city planning who is trying to kind of figure out where the new neighborhoods in our city, what do we do from a planning and zoning effort, prioritizing. is it small businesses now in pier 70 area or do with we go high-rises downtown? what kind of people trends and business trends and constituent trends are happening in our neighborhoods * ? that data is there to be shared with our city planning. so we can plan for the future and make sure when we're not planning to limit the kind of growth that we want to encourage. >>> and then we've got another exciting one. chris haug is here and the company hundred-plus is here today. they have worked on, for many years, health related data. and they're going to roll out the opportunity where people can get information about what exists in our city that they can utilize or go to that will affect their health in a positive way. for me, i'm looking at an apparatus that will be on my wrist that will tell me every time i should go to the golf course. [laughter] >> because that's where my exercise happens. the more i walk on the golf course like i did 18 holes yesterday morning at 6:00 a.m., the more healthy i'm going to be in the long run. it's things like that where people don't know there might be an existent location that they don't know about that could be related to their health. and they could have that instantaneously. >>> these are just three of some of, i think, just hoards of examples that when we allow data analytics and this is really to me a technology geek's really dream, is to have all of this data available so that we can mine them in different ways and very creative ways. and i want to say, again, as someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish smal
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 7:30pm PST
cto and co-founder. this was a very long, long journey with the city, but we had the help of leaders like phil, mayor lee, jay driving behind the scenes, the efforts for business to work with government. and i think we've accomplished that with this unique partnership moving forward. we're excited now there's cross-department collaboration with the san francisco arts, with the san francisco public art which has now been thanks to sean working late last night, putting the public arts into golden gate park. this is providing access. it's providing efficiency, and it's providing new revenue streams and opportunities for the city of san francisco and other departments. we are really excited to be here and i thank you all again for this opportunity to be able to innovate, to be able to work with the city of san francisco, and have this incredible opportunity to be here at the hatchery launching our application and our company. thank you very much. (applause) >> thank you, yo. so, san francisco has been a leader in open data for the past three years nationally. in 2009 we launched our open
SFGTV
Dec 12, 2012 10:00pm PST
. and furthermore the e pc is work to go install -- throughout the city and we are starting to see some major improvements the city has installed 11 water bottle filling stations to date and there are important reasons to promote tap water it's better for the environment is it saves residents money and cuts down on the sugary consumption of beverages as well. and i also want to invite residents that i'm hold be coffee hours on ole gai ass cafe on the outer rich mopped and then my evening hours have a bear with me at steins on clement street and eight avenue near the old colosseum theater and on sat i'll be joining with the justice committee commemorating the 75th anniversary of the terrible tragedy 75 year ago at the chinese cultural center. the rest i'll submit. >> thank you mr. avalos. >> colleague i have one item for intrusion today it's an ordinance that would require the wick epipark commission to hold information hearing on permit complications for large scale multiday events in our parks only this will help the lincoln's park outreach around these expeftsz promote public trust an
SFGTV2
Dec 31, 2012 6:00am PST
, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engineers found that development along the waterfront was causing pollution. so their search led them to the nearby schuylkill river. philadelphia developed technologies to pump water from the river into the city
SFGTV
Dec 26, 2012 6:30am PST
cable cars. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts and ends. and many trips in san francisco, and we want more of them in between, to be on foot as well because it's a nicer way to enjoy the city. but if we want people to be out and walking, we need them to be safe. we want them to feel safe, and that's what we're here to talk about today. and none of that will happen without great leadership. so, without further ado, happy to bring up our great leader, the mayor of the city and county, ed lee. (applause) >> thank you. thank you, david. i'm the other ed. happy holidays, everybody, and thank you for being here. we are initializing our pedestrian safety, pedestrian strategy, and we've had a task force that have included our police department, our
SFGTV2
Dec 27, 2012 9:30pm PST
ought to really establish some guidelines to open up our city's data. and in the year later, the board, less legislation, the first open data legislation in san francisco that made us cutting edge throughout the country, the first to come out and say to everybody in the public, to people who wanted to create businesses, wanted to look at the city with kind of an open invitation to involve themselves with what the city had. and part of that really neat understanding was that we were holding onto so much of our own data in our own silos with our own very focused obligations that we had, and not realizing that if we had released that data to the public, we could really allow them to help us create even more efficient government, along with some very good entrepreneurial efforts that are reflected in today's announcements and some of our partners that are here today. so, three years later, after announcing this and after doing the first generation of open data legislation, open sf is still a very vigorous, and we want to do even more. we've teamed up again with board president david
SFGTV
Dec 6, 2012 5:30pm PST
the city's employees are hired by small businesses. and i want to continue supporting them, nurturing them, have them increase. i hate seeing vacant, vacant buildings, vacant spots. benny knows every time we walk down there, what's going on with this site? what's going on with that site? char men chu knows that as well. we've done a lot of walks together. i want to see every one of these vacancies filled with small bustling business necessarition. we need them to hire more local folks. and one way to do it, one sure way to do it is to make sure that they meet the a-d-a requirements, the federal requirements, the state requirements, our local efforts to make sure that those that have disabilities can also shop and be a participant in our local economy. so, with that, joaquin, thank you for your leadership. we get to launch this wonderful program right here. there are three streets in district 4 that are going to benefit from this. we're going to roll this out to all other 85 neighborhood corridors in the rest of the city. it's that many? 25? [laughter] >> all right, christmas must be c
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